Council

There are various reports required for development approval, depending on overlays on your property. These include:

    arrow  Easements
Things to know
  • Easements are typically created over a portion of land to allow someone access to the easement area for a specific purpose.
  • Easements are commonly required for maintenance of utilities and are located over sewer and water pipes, stormwater pipes, power lines etc.
  • It is also common for easements to be created for shared vehicle access through properties.
  • Easements are recorded on a land title and is agreed to by the landowner. The easement stays recorded on the title even if the land is sold to someone else.
  • The landowner usually cannot build structures within an easement area or use fencing that would hinder access.
  • Before building within or over an easement, you are required to obtain approval from the easement owner.
    arrow  Flooding
Things to know
  • If your property is identified in a potential flood area, it is important to understand the possible impacts (i.e. frequency of a flood event and depth) on the property during extreme weather events.
  • Being located in a flood area does not necessarily mean it will flood but rather has been identified as a possibility. There are three common types of flooding that can occur:
    • River, creek or waterway flooding - prolonged rain falls causing high flows of water to rise and flow over river’s banks and into surrounding properties.
    • Local overland flow flooding - water that runs across the ground after heavy rainfall, and may occur quickly.
    • Storm surge - wind from a storm pushes the ocean towards land causing higher than normal sea levels which may affect low-lying areas close to tidal waterways and shores.
  • Building new, developing or extending an existing building in a potential flood area, may be subjected to Council’s building requirements (e.g. minimum floor heights).
    arrow  Bushfire
Things to know
  • If your property is located in a potential bushfire area, it is important to understand the possible impacts a nearby bushfire might have on the property.
  • Being located in a bushfire area does not necessarily mean a bushfire will occur nearby, but rather has been identified as an area with the conditions to support a bushfire.
  • A dry climate, the density of surrounding trees and a steep landscape can contribute to the impact and intensity of a bushfire.
  • If you want to build on or develop in a bushfire area, your building may be required to meet specific construction requirements to ensure the safety of residents.

Please contact Council or a building certifier to identify any relevant safety requirements for your site.

    arrow  Biodiversity
Things to know
  • Properties located in biodiversity areas may have tree clearing restrictions of native vegetation.
  • Your property may be in a biodiversity area if it:
    • Is located near or in a river, creek or a waterway corridor.
    • Is located in a bush land area or rural area with native vegetation.
    • Contains large significant trees. Even in an urban area the trees have heritage values.

Please contact Council or a local arborist to find out more information about clearing trees and developing a site with biodiversity considerations.

    arrow  Heritage
Things to know
  • Heritage places are to be retained or restored to preserve their heritage value.
  • Any extensions or alterations to existing heritage buildings should complement the traditional building style. There may also be demolition restrictions for existing heritage buildings.
  • Development on sites on or next to heritage places should also preserve and complement the traditional character of the heritage building and the surrounding area.
  • If a property is identified in a character area, any new houses or an extension to a house may need to be designed to fit in with the existing building character of the area.

Please contact Council or a building certifier if you have any questions about a heritage place.

    arrow  Landslide risk
Things to know
  • A property located in or near steep slopes and soil stability is of concern, may be identified as a potential landslide area.
  • Properties with potential landslide areas may be subject to regular erosion requiring management and stabilisation works to protect the property.

Please contact the Council or a structural engineer to find out more information. If within a potential landslide area, we recommend contacting Council for more information.

    arrow  Noise impact
Things to know
  • Some properties may be located near uses that generate noise such as road, rail and airport traffic.
  • These noise generating uses can cause some nuisance for the occupants of a building if it is loud and consistent.
  • When building, extending or developing in a noise potential area, you may be required to consider design features that reduce noise for the residents of the building.
  • Common design features Council may require include installing double glazing windows, noise attenuation doors and fences.
  • You may wish to contact an acoustic engineer for more information.
    arrow  Stormwater
Things to know
  • Council stormwater pipes collect piped roof water and surface water from a number of properties and direct flows away from buildings.
  • These pipe are owned by Council and generally feed into large pipes which collect water from the street curb and channel.
  • A dry climate, the density of surrounding trees and a steep landscape can contribute to the impact and intensity of a bushfire.
  • You may need Council approval to build over or near a large stormwater pipe. It is important to locate these pipes before digging to ensure they are not damaged.
  • Please contact the Council to access detailed plans that show the size and depth of pipes.
    arrow  Sewer and Water
Things to know
  • Water mains carry potable water from water treatment facilities to properties to use for drinking, washing and watering of gardens.
  • Sewer mains carry waste water away from properties to sewage treatment facilities.
  • It is important to locate these pipes before you start any underground work, to avoid costly damage to the mains.
  • If you are planning to develop or renovate a property and the building work is close to or over water and sewer mains, you may be required to obtain approval from Council or the Service Authority and you may need to contact a company who specialises in surveying underground services.
    arrow  Power
Things to know
  • Power lines (overhead or underground) transmit electricity from power stations through cables to individual properties. It is important to locate these cables before digging or undertaking overhead work near power lines, to ensure they are not damaged or workers injured.
  • Being located in a bushfire area does not necessarily mean a bushfire will occur nearby, but rather has been identified as an area with the conditions to support a bushfire.
  • A dry climate, the density of surrounding trees and a steep landscape can contribute to the impact and intensity of a bushfire.
  • If you want to build on or develop in a bushfire area, your building may be required to meet specific construction requirements to ensure the safety of residents.
  • Please contact Council or a building certifier to identify any relevant safety requirements for your site.

Local council or Certifier also require to following for Building and plumbing approval:

  • Contour survey of the property (partial if large land parcel).
  • Footings soil test (also required by the engineer for footing and slab design).
  • Energy efficiency report (relating to insulation and glass areas).
  • On site sewerage disposal design (for non-sewered areas only).
  • Hydraulic engineering design (generally only for commercial projects).
  • Engineering design and certification of all structural members.